Sunday, 30 July 2017

We Are the World Blogfest … # 5 - Beachy Head Emergency Services



… in Darkness, Be Light – a blogfest of creative posts on all manner of subjects … highlighting positivity and opening the door to letting more light into our lives --- we the lucky ones …




Today I invite you to remember the Emergency Services who look after our coasts … in my case the area of outstanding natural beauty that is Beachy Head: the white cliffs of Sussex.


Attending to an emergency



There are the accidents … be they people just too near the edge, who step back, and then are gone …




Land slip apparent here - imagine what it would be
like if it collapsed from the cliffs round the corner


… or when the cliffs collapse underneath them – as they sit ‘quietly’ admiring the views … not realising the power of the tide (twice a day) as it pounds these crumbling cliffs leaving an overhang at the top – which every so often crashes to the sea ... 



The steeper slopes with
chalk cliff slippage
… or the cliff collapse onto the  beach below … was anyone there, or injured …


… or those rescued after being cut off by the tide …

 I often hear the sirens of the police, ambulances, or air ambulances … then there’s the coast guard and the lifeboats that I see out in all weathers …




There is a chaplaincy team on hand too … as sadly it is a place to come to … to commit suicide … just desperate … and something we all need to remember … as our actions can help others.  The Samaritans are on hand too ... 


Too near


So many people involved in helping keep the Beachy Head area as safe as possible … our Emergency and Volunteer Services are invaluable and deserve our recognition …



Thank you for remembering them with me … I’m sure you have similar services wherever you live – let us give thanks for them and their work …



We are the World ... in Darkness, be Light ...

Sign up to join us and be visited on the last weekend of the month when our articles are posted.  Click here to enter your link on this Linky Tools list!

This month’s #WATWB co-hosts are: Simon Falk, Roshan Radhakrishnan, InderpreetUppal, Sylvia Stein and Damyanti Biswas

Please stop by and read the inspiring stories  …


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

76 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

Huge thanks to those who do these difficult jobs - the world over.

RO said...

What a great way to commend the hard work of these teams, and the pics of the water are breathtaking. Hope your Sunday is amazing!

A Heron's View said...

I have always believed that high places: cliffs and mountains are best viewed from a distance and so Beachy Head and other sea cliffs can be best viewed a quarter of a mile away, from the deck of a large boat.

Anabel Marsh said...

Agreed, we should always be grateful for those risking their lives to help others. Around here, that also includes mountain rescue teams.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Sad that they are needed but bravo to the men and women who volunteer and respond to such tragedies.

Kay G. said...

I have written of Beachy Head before AND the emergency services, what a fantastic job they do! They are all HEROES!

Once, I was determined to get a shot of the lighthouse on a very cold, windy day... I left my husband with his friends at the Beachy Head Pub (you know the one ...can't remember if that is what it is called, but the only one there!!) Anyway, I purposefully strode towards the cliffs and as I drew closer to the edge, I felt that someone was watching me...there was some kind of post there, and I hooked my elbow around it and proceeded to take a photo.
I realized that the people behind me walked away, when I put that arm around the post, they must have thought that I was going to jump but when they saw me stop and take the photo...they then knew it was a crazy American who had to get her picture of the lighthouse! So sorry that I made them think otherwise, I have also heard them try to talk people out of jumping off the edge.

Simon Falk said...

Hilary, thanks for this post. Emergency services are heroes who are not sung of enough. May they know our gratitude. I also enjoyed the Sussex scenes. Simon’s Still Stanza #WATWB

Bob Scotney said...

I've never made it to Beachy Head, but appreciate the coastal dangers. One of our grandsons is an RNLI lifeguard in Cornwall.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC - yes emergency services everywhere around the globe, volunteers or paid, deserve our thanks ...

@ RO - thank you the #WATWB seemed a good way to highlight their help and the assistance they provide - I'm forever seeing and hearing them going out to rescue others. My flat is on the seafront from where the pic was taken from ... so I get a bird's eye view quite often.

@ Mel - I agree the coast is probably best viewed high up and far away - yet one can get a really good view across back to Eastbourne and the bay, or westwards towards Brighton when one is on the Downs above Beach Head - just getting too near the edge is not a good thing.

@ Anabel - yes I only posted about the local emergency services, though know there are others including the mountain rescue teams.

@ Alex - yes very sad they are needed ... but the Services are here thankfully and they do help and rescue people from taking their own lives.

@ Kay - as you know Beachy Head is an incredible place ... but has need of the Emergency Services in all weathers and at all times of the year.

I think if there'd be a warden around - they'd have been fairly unhappy about you taking a photo that way - I wonder if the post is still there ... we've had some cliff falls off that area. So perhaps regardless of the post - you were quite lucky ...

@ Simon - glad you enjoyed the Sussex scenes - hardly a day goes by without an emergency service haring out to sort something out ... or the lifeboat or helicopter going past - I see it all. We are so lucky they are there to help.

@ Bob - it's a very pretty area to see ... and is wonderful up there at certain times with amazing views. That's excellent work your grandson is doing in Cornwall - lifeguarding isn't easy ... cheers Hilary

DMS said...

Thanks for spotlighting these wonderful workers and reminding all of us about the people who help others along the shore. So many different things they have to be ready for! I would imagine it is a stressful job, as you never know what emergency might come your way. A huge thank you to them and those with similar jobs elsewhere.

Thanks for sharing. :)
~Jess

Out on the prairie said...

What a lovely place, I would be one taking a risk getting close. That last step can be a big one.

Jz said...

A friend grew up in Cuckmere, so the last time I was over there, he took me out along Seven Sisters. You can see all the pictures you like but it never really prepares you for how gorgeous those cliffs are. But I have to admit, I'd never thought about the suicides until I saw a couple of markers along our way.

I brought home a small pebble of chalk and have been trying to exhort it to grow into a cliff.
No luck yet but I haven't given up! (I'll keep you posted... ;-p)

Rhodesia said...

There are so many caring people in the world, thanks for the reminder. I have followed in my father's footsteps and we donate every year to RNLI. My Dad was in the merchant navy and I think he understood how much danger the people are who risk their lives to save others. Cheers Diane

Paula Kaye said...

Thank you for sharing this with me today. Yes, so many people to be thankful for.

M. Denise C. said...

Seeing the beautiful cliffs from afar, I tend to forget that they can be so dangerous up close. Yes, let's be thankful for those helpers!

Emily Bloomquist said...

Yes Hilary, a huge thank you for all that they do! People forget their surroundings when they are trying to get the perfect picture and put themselves at great risk. As you said, they also forget to factor in nature and how powerful it can be.

Julie Flanders said...

So tragic to imagine how many have committed suicide in this beautiful place. I can't imagine the work of chaplains in such situations. We are definitely fortunate to have such selfless people in our world!

Ann Bennett said...

So much to admire in first responders. I hope to go to Britain one day and look at the white cliffs.

Lynn Hallbrooks said...

It takes a special kind of skills to do what they do. Thanks for reminding us to show our gratitude to all of them that serve others in these ways. Thanks also for being a part of #WATWB

D Biswas said...

These services the world over are so important and so many of these individuals go beyond the call of duty to save lives.

Thanks for posting about this org, Hilary, and for your continued support to WATWB.

Damyanti

Joanne said...

Indeed, I admire the folks who run forward into the chaos to correctly help and save lives. Very admirable and amazing.
Coincidentally we visited the Oklahoma Memorial Museum this weekend in OKC. Wow - 1995, the federal building was blown up and while 168 people died, so many were rescued. The museum is tremendous and somber. But the worker bees who worked hard day and night in recovery were outstanding.
Your post is a good reminder

Jo said...

Beachy Head is such a delightful spot, it is a pity it is the scene of so much tragedy. All the people you have mentioned do a wonderful job

I am rather surprised they don't fence off the headland. Would it not be safer?

Truedessa said...

Cheers to those who risk their lives to help others, may they be blessed.

Liz A. said...

Tough job. But important.

J Lenni Dorner said...

That's amazing! And great images with the post. Lighthouses are amazing. This is one of those things that people don't think about, but would be lost without.

Nas said...

Thanks for highlighting this job, Hilary. They do such an important job.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Jess – thanks for visiting … we do tend to forget the people around us, who are always there to help. I’m sure they get really worried sometimes at each emergency … but as with most things the more you do – the ‘easier’ it gets … those steps are well practised – then they have ‘time’ to think about the seriousness of the actual case they are dealing with …

@ Steve – and if you did get too close … some of us would watch anxiously … as I’ve done on occasions – that last step could be the last one.

@ Jz – I agree one can’t visualise how beautiful the area is – until one actually visits …and sees the sun glistening off the creamy cliffs, or how far one can see on clear days … sadly this is a suicide ‘hot spot’ …

Your friend lived in a wonderful area round here … the Cuckmere is one of those gorgeous spots too, when the river meanders down to the sea.

I’m afraid your pebble is longing to become much smaller … so don’t touch, or let it get wet, or too dry and it may still survive another million years!! Also – yes please let me know if you suddenly find yourself with a cliff of chalk …!

@ Diane – there are some amazing people who are ready to help us in an emergency … and I know many of us contribute to the RNLI … but it’s a great tribute to your father that you both continue on his tradition of regular support …

@ Paula – it’s good they are there to help us in our times of emergent need …

@ Denise – the cliffs are really dangerous … just waiting to crumble away, as they slowly do each year. Thank goodness for emergency services being there for those in need …

@ Emily – you can get so close to the edge 530 feet up … and selfies are the rage – one lad did step back and sadly that was that …

The raging sea below, or the torrential storms above, and the dry periods all contribute to this erosion of our coastline … landscapes change …

@ Julie – it is so desperate people go down into depression and sink to depths so low – they don’t want to live, so often when they have a lot to offer. Chaplains must be special people … and yes, we are lucky to have such special selfless people to help us …

@ Ann – I hope you get over to see these white cliffs – they are beautiful … but our coast line, like other continents, is amazingly varied. First responders deserve our support …

@ Lynn – it’s that dedication that these amazing people give or are ready to give us in times of desperate need … we need to remember to help and offer support to them. It’s a pleasure being a part of #WAWTB …

@ Damyanti – thanks for setting up #WAWTB … it’s great to meet some new bloggers who are participating and seeing how much positivity and goodness that happens in large ways and small ways around the world. Emergency Services fortunately are always on call to help …

@ Joanne – coincidental as you mention. I remember that massacre – I was in South Africa. I too remember that many died, yet many would have died had they not been rescued byt eh Emergency Services.

The Oklahoma Memorial Museum must be very sombre and … I can’t think of the right words – though I can imagine what it might be like. So unfair that so many died by one man’s ‘foolish’ and misguided action …

@ Jo – Beachy Head is a real draw for many days out … beautiful scenery, good walks etc … it’s unfenceable … ie it crumbles away and is receding at quite a rate (estimated at about 10 inches a year) … it’d be impossible to keep people out, people would always break through …

@ Truedessa – we are fortunate that so many are prepared to help.

@ Liz – at times a very tough job … but so important.

@ JL – yes if we didn’t have emergency services we would be lost …

@ Nas – the emergency services here on the Downs do wondrous work helping people in dire straits … we, as you mention, are lucky …

Thanks everyone – so good to see you all – our Emergency Services are an essential part of our lives – all the best Hilary

Marja said...

What a wonderful idea to focus on the positive and wonderful organisations like the emergency services. Great job they do

baili said...

I salute you for such uplifting post my friend!
i wish more people can think and act like this and make this world a better place to live .
it means humanity is the most important thing in this world and humanity is the original true religion for all of us

Pat Hatt said...

They sure put their life on the line to help others and get the job done. Wonderful people out there indeed. Same can't always be said for some who don't use common sense when near cliffs.

bazza said...

Good call! The people who do these jobs are often unpaid volunteers (Lifeboat crews, Samaritans etc). Crumbling cliffs are a real problem around the south coast. I'm not sure if the situation has changed, but until recently, Lulworth Cove was too dangerous to approach.
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s pervasive Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Kali Delamagente said...

We have similar efforts for hikers stranded in the mountains. These rescue folks really amaze me, that they have no qualms about going into harms way to rescue people. No questions asked; just do it.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Marja - I'm sure there are local people doing wonders, but I don't know them ... so these volunteers and emergency helpers do so much for us here on the Downs (as the area is known).

@ Baili - we are lucky to have our emergency services available to us here in the UK - while it'd be great if more people were more careful and aware of the vagaries of the cliffs, and the tides.

@ Pat - sometimes they really do go above and beyond the call of duty helping people in distress - here we have the most terrible falls down the cliffs - some survive thanks to the Services - and yes some more common sense would help.

@ Bazza - as you so rightly say many of them are unpaid ... while our crumbling cliffs are very fragile - we've had a few cliff falls recently. I'm not sure if they've fenced off Lulworth Cove or the entrance to it - I think they were looking at repairing it ... but cars can get down to the Cove itself ... it looks like the path is fenced off.

@ Kali - yes I didn't mention being stranded in the mist and fog on mountains ... they also apply - and as you say they go out in all weathers to help ... with no questions asked.

Cheers to you all - we are so lucky to have emergency services with their skills on hand to help in times of need ... thanks for your visits - Hilary

cleemckenzie said...

A very lovely tribute, Hilary. Along the California coast we have areas with the same sheer cliffs and the same dangers. People who risk their lives to save lives or recover those who die from these areas are to be applauded.

Sandra Cox said...

These folks are true heroes. Thanks for honoring them.
Your cliffs are breathtakingly beautiful.
Have a great one, Hilary.

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

Those who chose to work in emergency services are amazing and do such an amazing job

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lee - thanks ... I know lots of emergency services around the world and I imagine someone going off your coast wouldn't have much chance with those rocky falls. Thankfully the emergency services people now have better equipment for some of their rescue needs ...

@ Sandra - yes I agree anyone in Emergency Services must be so well practised, yet so patient and diplomatic at times. This part of the world is beautiful - I'm lucky to be living here ...

@ Jo-Anne - you're right those who work in Emergency Services are incredible and do a much appreciated job ...

Thanks so much - good to see you ... cheers Hilary

Edwin Nyakang'i said...

Can't agree more Hilary, emergency workers deserve commendation for their selflessness. Most of them literally put their lives on the line to save another's.
Thanks for sharing these thoughts.

Blogoratti said...

Such life saving work being done by these wonderful souls. More power to them. Thanks for the heartwarming post and greetings!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Edwin - good to see you ... they do put their lives at risk while saving others ... emergency workers and volunteers are always on call for all things at whatever time of day and night ...

@ Blogoratti - totally agree ... more power to them - they deserve our support and our recognition ...

Cheers to you both - Hilary

Elsie Amata said...

Such a great tribute to wonderful people that serve your community. Many of our ambulance and fire departments and search and rescue teams are volunteer too. Great heroes.

Robert Bennett said...

This is so cool! Now I'm kind of curious if we have anything like that out here in California. I don't think I've ever heard of a group like that.

Michael Di Gesu said...

Hi Hilary,

What a lovely tribute to such an admirable group. Yes, these people are what I call "Earthy Angels."

Victoria Marie Lees said...

I feel all emergency teams deserve our thanks and support for all they do. Thanks for reminding us, Hilary.

H.R. Sinclair, Southpaw said...

Nicely said. Thanks to all these folks. It must be hard not only physically but emotionally.

Crystal Collier said...

I second everything you wrote. Until I moved to NYC, I didn't appreciate emergency response people that much, but living so close to so many other people with so many emergencies... Eye opening. Here's to the unsung heroes who often risk their lives for the sake of others!

diedre Knight said...

It's hard to imagine an unhappy person in such a lovely setting. The volunteers are heartwarming proof that angels do walk among us.

Chrys Fey said...

That cliff sounds like an interesting setting for a story...maybe a mystery, murder/crime story...

All emergency teams are godsends. This is a nice reminder that we need to remember all they do.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Elsie – they are so wonderful people serving the local community and I’m sure many towns have fire, ambulance and search and rescue teams working in their neighbourhoods – thank goodness for them.

@ Robert – I’m sure you do … someone mentioned the rescue services who help out along your rocky cliff line … but it’ll be good if you check them out …

@ Michael – that’s a good name … ‘Earthly Angels’ … and they certainly are admirable and so willing ..,

@ Victoria – totally agree … all those who put aside their time to help others deserve our support …

@ Holly – thanks … I know it’s hard – after yesterday with thick rain, heavy mist, and stormy seas [yet it is August] there were emergency services out in full force.

@ Crystal – I think so many things/services go unnoticed until we need them or know of someone in an emergency who utilised a service – they do work almost behind the scenes. I can believe you saw lots of unsung heroes in NYC … as I’ve done in London or Johannesburg …

@ Diedre – sadly people travel here to commit suicide – thankfully some get ‘rescued’ from the brink … they are saved and actually saved to live on through the various agencies – but it’s always the people, who relate …

@ Chrys – lots of stories have been set amongst our cliffs or coastline - and they’re still being written … a new Sherlock Holmes Novel ‘Gods of War’ was released in 2014 – it’s set in this area … here’s a link to the places mentioned in the book:

https://www.beachyhead.org.uk/news/2014/06/beachy-head-is-the-setting-for-new-sherlock-holmes-novel/

Thanks for coming by – it’s good we remember our own services of volunteers or paid helpers … we have just had a foul 24 hours …and I’m sure they were out in force here - cheers Hilary

Empty Nest Insider said...

Hi Hilary, What a wonderful tribute to these exceptional heroes! The emergency volunteers are truly selfless, and deserve our deepest gratitude. Thanks for shining a light on them, Hilary!

Julie

Ronel Janse van Vuuren said...

Interesting facts about the cliffs crumbling. It must be terrifying when the world gives in under you... Luckily there are volunteers to help. Thanks for sharing :-)

RO said...

Just stopping by with a wave! Hugs...RO

Suzanne Furness said...

Obviously, similar services here Hilary as you know. I can't thank the emergency services enough for all they do. And as you so rightly say, volunteers in various capacities too.

C.D. Gallant-King said...

I come from an island province where we are constantly at the mercy of the ocean, so it's something always forefront on our minds. I have a number of friends and relatives in the coast guard and rescue services (and quite a few in volunteer fire departments, too). My son has a coast guard LEGO boat on the shelf above his bed. I see the local emergency teams practicing on the river outside my office regularly.

I never thought about it before, but the Coast Guard and related services are something I'm never going to forgot. :-)

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Emergency responders all over the world deserve our gratitude. Most of them are very dedicated to the work they do, and they sure don't do it for the money.

Thanks to your pictures, a song is now imbedded in my head... "The White Cliffs of Dover." Your cliffs are so beautiful, but apparently, very hazardous, too. (I guess we're still waiting hopefully for the "love and laughter and peace ever after"...)

Cheers!

Lynn said...

I admire the work they do and shudder to think of anyone falling from those cliffs. They are so lovely.

Shilpa Garg said...

Kudos to these silent workers who save people and make a big difference in the lives of so many of them. Thanks for sharing about the Emergency and Volunteer Services, Hilary!

L. Diane Wolfe said...

Those people put their lives on the line for others. Wonderful choice.

troutbirder said...

Heroic emergency people indeed. I have great respect for them and the risks they take pulling people out of risky situations. Standing above the Cliffs of Mohr on a very windy day made me very conscious of high cliffs above a storm tossed ocean....

Christine Rains said...

A big thanks to those marvelous people.

Sandra Cox said...

Just stopped by to say, hey.
Hope your day has been productive and pleasant.

Lynda R Young said...

All the different emergency services across the world do an amazing job.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Julie – we are so lucky to have them and the seas recently have been really rough – even though it’s warm (relatively) … lots of rescuing required …

@ Ronel – the cliffs here will be crumbling even more soon – we’ve had some quite big falls this year already … I agree it must be awful to feel the world falling away as a cliff slippage occurs, let alone if one is underneath – that happens too …

@ Ro – many thanks – hugs back …

@ Suzanne – yes, fortunately the services are available around our coasts – as too yours in Cornwall … and the volunteers – we are so lucky …

@ CD – if you’re in one of those coastal communities then those volunteer people are always available … coming from Cornwall we as a family know that. Coast guards have a very pertinent role in island or coastal life … and it’s good to know you have friends and relatives in various services. Delightful to think of that coast guard LEGO boat on a shelf above your son’s bed …

They lifeboat practices here regularly … also the helicopter rescue service – as you’ve mentioned seeing your local services practising from your office window. The coast guard I’m sure is a service you won’t forget …

@ Susan – you’re right emergency responders are great people there for us in times of need. The South Downs end here at Eastbourne, but the North chalk Downs appear further east in Kent and include the White Cliffs of Dover … the song is very evocative … yes these cliffs are really quite crumbly and unsafe at the edges … beautiful too …

@ Lynn- sadly people do fall from the cliffs, or get buried at the bottom after a fall … it is a beauty spot for so many of us …

@ Shilpa – as you say ‘kudos to those silent workers’ – we are lucky to have them available for us …

@ Diane – they certainly do put their lives on the line to help others …

@ Troutbirder – your trip to Ireland sounded wonderful … and I’m glad you had time to reflect when you visited the cliffs at Moher – they are high, formed of jagged shale and sandstone, rising above the storm tossed ocean.

@ Christine – yes a big thank you is so appropriate …

@ Sandra – thanks for popping by …

@ Lynda – I agree we are lucky to have so many agencies on hand to help us when they are needed at that moment’s notice …

Thanks so much to you all for visiting – the Services have been hard at work this week … our English summer is rather stormy at the moment … have good weekends – cheers Hilary

Gattina said...

You bring back so many memories ! I have been so often at Beachy Head ! I even crawled on my belly to until the edge and looked down ! Terrible fortunately I wasn't standing I would have gotten dizzy !
This year I won't come to Eastbourne. I have been doing a tour around Ireland and there is not much time left. It will be the first time I am not coming after 9 years !

bookworm said...

Beautiful views-No idea of the lurking dangers. I'll be sharing this shoutout to your emergency services. The Unknown Journey Ahead agingonthespectrum.blogspot.com

Madeleine Sara said...

Gods blessings on them all.

Ann Best said...

Hi, dear friend. What an important post, recognizing those who look after their fellow humans. They deserve glory, laud, and honor! (Yes, I'm back, again blogging, again on a limited basis ... choosing whom I want/can keep in touch with. As you say in your positive way, Interaction is the Key! It's a WordPress blog, though ... I will send you an email soon to explain it. URL onceuponamemoirblog.com)

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

Well, finally, eventually, I've actually arrived here to comment on your post. Must type quick because, predictably, Penny has decided she needs to go out, yet again.

Those who do such heroic work at Beachy head, the professionals and the volunteers of the emergency services, do such a stellar job and selflessly, put their own lives potentially at risk. Kudos and respect to them.

Wishing you a peaceful weekend, Hilary.

Gary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Gattina - yes Beachy Head is a draw if you're visiting - but you most certainly shouldn't have crawled to look over ... you could easily have gone with the collapsed cliff. You've been busy ... but 9 years of visiting has enabled you to see quite a lot.

@ Claudia - there are signs saying danger ... but as you can tell people just don't take on board the dangers ...

@ Madeleine - yes we are lucky the emergency services and volunteers are around to help when needed.

@ Ann- how good to see you and I've connected. Thankfully we have these wonderful people who are prepared to serve, or who work in emergency services ...

@ Gary - lovely to see you - oh dear Penny still, quite rightly, ruling the waves!! Those services are run by wonderful and understand people - we are lucky .. as you say: kudos and respect to them ...

Thanks everyone - it's always good to remember these Emergency Services, they are always there in the background (so often) for us ... but ready when needed. Thankfully the weather has calmed down ... but the crumbling cliffs will crumble as and when! Cheers - Hilary

Michelle Wallace said...

Thank goodness for these selfless individuals who risk their loves in the service of others. Thank you for showcasing these amazing people and their much-needed services!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Michelle - we can so easily forget our Emergency Workers til they're suddenly and urgently needed - when they respond so magnificently ... good to see you - cheers Hilary

dolorah said...

Emergency service workers deserve every penny they are paid.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Donna ... if they are paid, yes ... if not I'm sure the benefit of giving (to save lives, or help in times of need) is almost certainly worth as much ... cheers Hilary

Keith's Ramblings said...

I regularly walk along the cliffs from Eastbourne to Seaford and I'm always moved by the little crosses and floral tributes on the cliff edge at Beachy Head. The Chaplains who patrol day and night do a wonderful job - one I really don't think I could do.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Keith ... it is sad up there, if one dwells on what can happen on the Downs. That's a good walk from here to Seaford ... I certainly couldn't be a Chaplain ... but over the years I've done my bit helping others. We are lucky that the Downs are regularly patrolled to help those Chaplains ... cheers Hilary

Mary Aalgaard said...

This is important work. Rescue teams risk their lives for others who in distress. God bless them.
Mary at Play off the Page